Posts Tagged ‘priority’

Hey Tim, Innovate This!

December 26, 2013

This is an open letter to Tim Cook at Apple.

Dear Tim,

Is the BOD challenging you to innovate more and put more distance between Apple and your competitors? Here is the top item of my “Wish List”:

Integrate every aspect of user context into operating system services.

For example, innovate this (please) for my iPhone:

Don’t bug me when I am busy in an important meeting!

Scenario – I am in a meeting, and that meeting appears on my iCal calendar. I don’t want my iPhone to ring unless a) the caller is on my VIP list, or b) the caller is on the meeting invitation list. I think that would be simple to do. … or c) don’t bug me unless the caller is a higher priority than my meeting (a little more difficult).  Do the same for Messenger notifications and perhaps e-mail notifications, too.

This third consideration requires me to prioritize meetings and also prioritize people with more granularity than “VIP” or “Not VIP”.

And another nuance to consider – don’t silence my calls when I am traveling at the airport or at some other location where I don’t mind the call. I put travel and personal business on my calendar – perhaps every event needs an election to manage notifications contextually or don’t… Perhaps we need a sense of a) public place context and b) private place context.

Another example from my wish list:

Direct the user interface to the best device at hand! And follow me as I move about…

Scenario – I am watching a YouTube video on my iPhone. When I step into my media room, the YouTube video is automatically directed to my AppleTV. When I leave the media room, the YouTube video is directed back to my iPhone. When I step into my office, the YouTube video is automatically directed to my iPad Air.

This is a toughie – tougher still, what if I don’t start watching that YouTube video on my iPhone and start the video on my desktop Mac? This requires a whole new generation of display devices that are bonjour-equipped, and/or wi-fi equipped and/or blue-tooth equipped so that display devices advertise their capabilities and location to my various computing devices.

Perhaps there is a new device concept lurking, here. I had a dream that I carried a futuristic iPhone in my pocket. It was mostly battery – very small and dense, and it did not have a display. Whenever I moved to a different environment, my iPhone would always utilize the best nearby display device and always have access to my many TB of local storage on my desktop, and to my iCloud storage, too. My futuristic iPhone would automatically use the best devices for audio I/O, video I/O, gesture interaction and text entry that were in my immediate environment. Wherever I was, my future iPhone was working in the background to optimize my user experience by making use of the variety of devices that fill my environment at work, at home, in the car, and at friends’ offices and homes, too. In this sense, my future iPhone’s phone function had faded way into the background, and it really became an intelligent user interface gateway.

I want my Apple devices to incorporate user context into their services, Tim. I know that’s a tall order. I really understand how difficult this is. I think that only Apple can pull it off!

By the way, I am really pleased with my new iPad Air! Tim, this is a terrific Apple product that meets every expectation of mine and even exceeds a few!

Contextual Communications Management – Do Away with I/O Overload!

February 18, 2013

I have been “cooking” this idea since about 2006. There was a day “in the day” when my ability to manage intrusive communications was obviously nil – a day of epiphany. On one miserable day, I was overwhelmed:

  • four meetings occupying more than 6 1/2 hours of the day;
  • more than 40 telephone calls to four phone numbers that I answered;
  • more than 40 voicemail messages on five messaging systems;
  • more than 250 e-mails sent to six addresses;
  • no complete record of calls I missed…

My clients were frustrated. I was frustrated.

I really faced three dilemmas:

  1. No Prioritization – the priority of one call was almost indistinguishable from the next unless I knew something related to the ID of the caller (if I even glanced at the Caller ID – if the ID was even displayed);
  2. No Integration – 15 separate communications portals…
  3. No Local Context – my telephone services interrupted my meetings as though every incoming call was more important than the meeting I was in (and some were).

I need only the sufficiently important communications right away – in only one stream – from any service – directed to any device – anywhere in the world I happen to be – with zero effort – without unnecessary distraction – all prioritized, summarized and logged. I call this concept Contextual Communications Management.

Since about 2008, I have been embarked on a campaign to influence AT&T, Apple and Google with features that will help me wrestle with the overwhelming communications environment I work in. I write letters, make phone calls, write white papers, draw pictures – anything that has a bit of promise to find implementations in AT&T, Apple and Google products and services.

Here is a simple process flow for incoming calls and voicemail messages to begin solving my problem (click for a higher res image):

Incoming Calls and Messages Managed

At first glance, I get two remarks from people – either “Huh?” or “Duh…” Either puzzlement or a brush-off as obvious. For any incoming call, I want to reject it (block it) if it will waste my time. If I don’t reject the call, I want to redirect it (forward it) if another person is a better resource to answer the call. If I don’t redirect the call, I want to ignore it for the time being (let the caller leave a message) if my present activity is more important. I want to answer the call if it is the best use of my time at the moment.

But it’s not obvious how to make the decision that the incoming call is the best use of my time. Let’s “peel the onion” just a bit. If you know the person calling or e-mailing or messaging, there is a basis to prioritize the call. Here is an example of that basis (again, click for higher res):

Who-Basis for PrioritizationIt’s not that complicated – my address book on my Mac has a category for “Priority” that I added long ago of Privileged (AT&T calls White-Listed; Apple calls VIP – their responses to my proposals), High, Medium, Low, Unknown or Denied (black-listed). Recognize the White List and Black List concepts from my Robocaller Blocker? Yup! My “RoboBlaster” focusses on identifying and blocking the lowest priority callers.

This just scratches the surface of Contextual Computing – utilizing the context of Who, What, When and Where to make automated decisions about communications, tasks, activities, collaboration and the presentation of information in the user environment.  A clever app will stop my phone from ringing in a meeting unless the caller has a higher priority than the meeting does. Get it? It’s not complicated, but that clever app will be! How to integrate all devices and services? That’s another problem I am writing about right now.

Look for my book on Contextual Computing at Amazon.com soon.  I’ll be sure to let you know how to order it when it is available.