Posts Tagged ‘prioritization’

Contextual Communications Management – Do Away with I/O Overload!

February 18, 2013

I have been “cooking” this idea since about 2006. There was a day “in the day” when my ability to manage intrusive communications was obviously nil – a day of epiphany. On one miserable day, I was overwhelmed:

  • four meetings occupying more than 6 1/2 hours of the day;
  • more than 40 telephone calls to four phone numbers that I answered;
  • more than 40 voicemail messages on five messaging systems;
  • more than 250 e-mails sent to six addresses;
  • no complete record of calls I missed…

My clients were frustrated. I was frustrated.

I really faced three dilemmas:

  1. No Prioritization – the priority of one call was almost indistinguishable from the next unless I knew something related to the ID of the caller (if I even glanced at the Caller ID – if the ID was even displayed);
  2. No Integration – 15 separate communications portals…
  3. No Local Context – my telephone services interrupted my meetings as though every incoming call was more important than the meeting I was in (and some were).

I need only the sufficiently important communications right away – in only one stream – from any service – directed to any device – anywhere in the world I happen to be – with zero effort – without unnecessary distraction – all prioritized, summarized and logged. I call this concept Contextual Communications Management.

Since about 2008, I have been embarked on a campaign to influence AT&T, Apple and Google with features that will help me wrestle with the overwhelming communications environment I work in. I write letters, make phone calls, write white papers, draw pictures – anything that has a bit of promise to find implementations in AT&T, Apple and Google products and services.

Here is a simple process flow for incoming calls and voicemail messages to begin solving my problem (click for a higher res image):

Incoming Calls and Messages Managed

At first glance, I get two remarks from people – either “Huh?” or “Duh…” Either puzzlement or a brush-off as obvious. For any incoming call, I want to reject it (block it) if it will waste my time. If I don’t reject the call, I want to redirect it (forward it) if another person is a better resource to answer the call. If I don’t redirect the call, I want to ignore it for the time being (let the caller leave a message) if my present activity is more important. I want to answer the call if it is the best use of my time at the moment.

But it’s not obvious how to make the decision that the incoming call is the best use of my time. Let’s “peel the onion” just a bit. If you know the person calling or e-mailing or messaging, there is a basis to prioritize the call. Here is an example of that basis (again, click for higher res):

Who-Basis for PrioritizationIt’s not that complicated – my address book on my Mac has a category for “Priority” that I added long ago of Privileged (AT&T calls White-Listed; Apple calls VIP – their responses to my proposals), High, Medium, Low, Unknown or Denied (black-listed). Recognize the White List and Black List concepts from my Robocaller Blocker? Yup! My “RoboBlaster” focusses on identifying and blocking the lowest priority callers.

This just scratches the surface of Contextual Computing – utilizing the context of Who, What, When and Where to make automated decisions about communications, tasks, activities, collaboration and the presentation of information in the user environment.  A clever app will stop my phone from ringing in a meeting unless the caller has a higher priority than the meeting does. Get it? It’s not complicated, but that clever app will be! How to integrate all devices and services? That’s another problem I am writing about right now.

Look for my book on Contextual Computing at Amazon.com soon.  I’ll be sure to let you know how to order it when it is available.

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