Posts Tagged ‘New Year’

Merry Christmas & Happy New Year – Part 2

December 26, 2011

I am having a good Christmas holiday – a Corsicana Bakery Christmas cake (yum!), cookies (and an enthusiastic Merry Christmas) from Shirley and her grade school daughter down the street, dinner a few nights before Christmas with Victor and his family and a few mutual friends JC, Smitha and Nagesh (and little Isha), phone calls with my mother, sister, brother and niece, a visit from Shoichi from Japan, annual correspondence from decades old friends like Don in Austin, Sy in Boston, Ginger in Phoenix, and Mike in Princeton (Texas), cards from new friends like Mike in NC, Christmas calls with PN vacationing in central Texas, Kevin in the Bay area, and JC’s extended family in Portland. Everyone is healthy and happy – THAT’S GREAT – I am so glad to hear good news from everyone this year in spite of a gloomy economy and its broad impact on many of my good friends.

I got a “pile” of books for Christmas to add to my two I am currently reading. When King’s 11/22/63 and Issacson’s Steve Jobs are finished, I’ll crack the binding of Crichton’s Micro, I think. I still like a real book – I like the heft of a hardbound book in my hands and the tactile feel of a page of paper. I haven’t quite warmed up to e-books, yet.

So, to all my friends, new and old, and to everyone else in the world, too, Merry Christmas and Nappy New Year! I hope 2012 is a good year for us all.

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Merry Christmas! 2012 will be an Interesting Year!

December 26, 2011

I’ll also say, “Happy Holidays!”, but, you know, I just prefer “Merry Christmas!” It is what has rolled off my tongue since I was a child. I sincerely hope everyone I know has a really great 2012 – and for that matter, I hope that everyone I Don’t know has a great year, too. I think that 2012 will be a very interesting year to watch pass.

I haven’t blogged for several months – just realized that my last post was in October – SHAME on ME…

I still have my nose pressed against the TV watching the politics parade pass us. This is theatre. President Obama has cleverly let frustrations fester among the voters – he couldn’t point at an ineffective Congress for 24 months, or he would  sound tired, and his message would be lost at election time. He has timed his attention to the problems at hand to suit the short attention span of average voters, and he will not only point to an ineffective Congress throughout 2012, but he will prove that they are ineffective when they accomplish nothing of note in the months leading up to the election. This may be a very effective strategy – perhaps the only effective strategy for him in his reelection campaign.

In the Republican “tent” of this circus, we still have a side show worth watching as the Republicans point to the “obvious” failures of the Democrats, though I don’t see it in the same light. Gingrich isn’t registered for the Virginia primary? What were his people doing? Perry, too? My forecast is that Perry will drop from sight, and Gingrich will find some wily way to climb back into the Virginia primaries. Just you watch! Mr. Paul doesn’t mince words, and he sticks honorably to his principles – he is still refreshing, but his views are much too far from the main stream for any affect. In this right wing of the circus tent, I still like Mr. Huntsman, but I am afraid that his cause is ultimately lost. My money is still on Mr. Romney to survive the primaries contest – he has nice hair.

Just the political fro of the Presidential elections will make 2012 an interesting year. And Congressional contenders have yet to make a peep… I’m listening…

Zakaria’s Christmas day program segment on CNN about leaders with an interesting Pulitzer price author raised a few ponderous thoughts in my mind and a friend’s in Palo Alto:

1) Four years is a long time to suffer a bad leader when the rest of the world spins so fast around us – do we need a Lack of Confidence vote mechanism like Canada and many other democracies in the world have?

2) Congress and much of the rest of the Federal government struggles to assure a failure and not a success as the parties fight each other (Boehner said he “fought the good fight”) for influence and affect. A leader would find a significant common cause worthy of all of Congress passionately fighting for a success.

3) The value of human life and the role of the United States in the world has changed wildly over the centuries since the founding fathers wrote the Constitution, and that makes the Tea Party’s call to return to the values of the founding fathers highly questionable and naively ill thought. We wonder what the Tea Partiers talk about over dinner (the days before the Modet T?)…

4) Law is “additive” – Congress creates new law continuously – that seems to be their present day mission, and Congress does not easily or often abolish law – and every law has a price or a burden, and the total burden of our laws is mounting! Should every law expire?

Not much leadership is required to “sail the present course”, but a leader of exceptional quality is required to change course and transition society to avoid a crisis or respond to one.  Zakariah’s commentary on leadership said that History has a kinder view, and that is quite correct, but he didn’t address the recognition of or solution to poor leadership in the present. That’s the problem of the average voter, and I am reminded of an old saying I have:

“The average person is very average.”

Well, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! 2012 will be an interesting year, indeed. I sincerely hope we all have a great year!